SpaceX launches Falcon Heavy from Florida for the first time since 2019

SpaceX launches Falcon Heavy from Florida for the first time since 2019

SpaceX has reportedly launched the most potent operational rocket in existence, Falcon Heavy, from Floridas Cape Canaveral after almost three years. Meanwhile, Elon Musks business launched a number of satellites for the U.S. Space Force into orbit.

It is worth mentioning that the rocket system was made up of three Falcon 9 boosters stacked together. It blasted off at a SpaceX launch pad amid heavy fog, along with two US Space Force satellites and a slew of smaller satellites to orbit.

At a height of around 47 miles (29 km), the vehicles two-side boosters simultaneously detached from the rockets core stage and successfully dove backward toward Earth. A few minutes later, the two boosters each about five floors tall restarted their engines and touched down on the nearly situated concrete slabs, to the roars of engineers inside the headquarters of SpaceX in Hawthorne, California, as seen on a live video from the firm.

The main booster did not make an attempt to touch down and instead expended all of its fuel to launch the satellites further into orbit. SpaceX has launched more than 100 missions with its reliable Falcon mission, the last of which was the Falcon Heavy mission in June 2019.

Interestingly, the construction of Starship, a larger and totally reusable rocket designed eventually to replace the companys Falcon fleet, has been a major area of concentration for SpaceX and its CEO Elon Musk, who is now also the CEO of social media powerhouse Twitter Inc.

NASA asserted that SpaceX intends to debut the deployment of Starship in early December 2022. Sources claim that the 50-meter Starship spacecraft will be delivered into orbit using the firms 70-meter Super Heavy launcher, serving as the first trial of the entire system.
 

Source Credit: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/us/us-spacex-launches-first-mission-of-worlds-most-powerful-active-rocket-in-three-years/articleshow/95235649.cms